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Hiroshi Yamauchi expanded Nintendo business into various industries outside gaming between 1963 and 1968, after it went IPO which gave him financial flexibility. The first offshoot is the “love hotel” business where people could rent rooms by the hour. Yamauchi was once famous for his affairs, and because hotels in Japan at that time only allowed booking for a night, his decided to open his own hotel allowed him free to entry as a frequent guest. The love hotels performing well, but ultimately being shut down because Yamauchi’s desire to explore other rising businesses. Nintendo also found success with taxi service, which quickly dissolved because a labor union dispute turned pricey. Nintendo’s last venture was an instant rice company, but, once again, Yamauchi ultimately decided to shut down to focus on the company’s historic roots in gaming. This time, Nintendo went all-in on the gaming industry with the next big thing were toys and electronic games. And thanks to assembly-line-workers, the “Beam Gun” was invented and released in 1970.

Ralph Baer, a German-American engineer, was an important element in making Nintendo became how it is today by developing a console where players could enjoy video games on a TV screen. Nintendo realized the possibility of the invention, and bought the rights in 1975 when the EVR Race was released.
In 1979, Minoru Arakawa, Yamauchi’s son-in-law, was appointed as the president of Nintendo of America, and launched shops in New York City to expand the business’s games to the West. Then Nintendo had set up a division for coin-operated games in 1979  in Seattle, where Arakawa oversaw product development which allow Shigeru Miyamoto — a young developer to create one of Nintendo’s now most famous games: “Donkey Kong.” in 1980 which consisted of a single premise: Jumpman, a carpenter, trying to rescue his girlfriend, Pauline, from pet gorilla, who’d kidnapped her. The player must run, jump, and climb a series of obstacles in an attempt to save her.