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Rovio’s recovery has been blocked somewhat by the rising costs of user acquisition and marketing, which is more and more relevant to survive the competitive free-to-play market. It must also go through the lengthy process of upgrading the brand itself. The games have been developed to suit the style of the movies, and Rovio has targeted popular audience to keep Angry Birds visible — the most recent example being this year’s launch, Angry Birds Dream Blast. It’s even combined with VR and AR with Isle of Pigs, which reinstating the classic slingshot gameplay in 3D.

Angry Birds in 2009 is quite different to what it is today. In 2016, there were big upgrades in the brand — the birds now are named, can speak with unique voices. Rovio did quite well to evolve and came out to be a fresh and relevant looking brand.

Revenue has also been consistent for Rovio in 2019 despite lacking of growth and lower profitability due to the rising costs of user acquisition. Fortunately, the next hit games are about to come which is Dream Blast, with Sensor Tower data showing it has created $43 million in user spending so far which has coincided with a decline in terms of revenues from Angry Birds 2’s in-app purchases. However, combination of spending of both games is slightly higher than Angry Birds 2 in its best month of October 2019, as it brought about $11.4 million.

Angry Birds took off faster than Rovio could have expected and keeping that momentum has been a challenge. Yet the series continues to prove it’s resilience, being ranked at No.32 in the list of 2019’s most popular games in terms of revenue thanks to its place at No.1 in terms of downloads. The birds’ popularity continues as long as Rovio stay focus on what they are doing and try to be the best at it.